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Profit Making and Risk in Independent Children’s Social Care Placement Providers

Local authorities in England spend more than £2bn a year buying fostering and children's homes services alone from private and voluntary sector organisations (collectively referred to as the independent sector). Local authorities themselves continue to provide most foster placements, but around two in every five foster placements are made with independent sector providers. In children's homes the reverse is true. Here, three in every four placements are made in the independent sector.

Children's Homes Research

The concerns of London local authorities in meeting sufficiency duties described in the first study and the severity of this in relation to residential children's homes, are recognised as a theme across the country. This study was commissioned by the LGA to look at the policies, barriers, and facilitators for local authorities and smaller independent providers in establishing children's homes.

Children's Care Commissioning Special Report

Commissioners of children's services are key to ensuring vulnerable young people get the right placements. CYP Now's special report looks at the latest developments, academic research and examples of best practice.

Review of Sufficiency Strategies in London

Demand for children's services has been increasing nationally in recent years. Changing demographics and evolving complexity of needs are also exerting cost pressures on local authorities. At the same time suitable accommodation is in short supply in the regulated children's homes sector and there are concerns about the increased use of unregulated placements. The situation is particularly acute in London.

Early adopters set out the key features of children’s trusts

When it launched its children’s social care reform programme nearly five years ago, the Department for Education expressed an ambition that a third of councils should be in the process of handing responsibility for services to a children’s trust, or had completed the process, by 2020.

Technology in Children's Services: Policy context

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  • Tuesday, March 31, 2020
At its best, technology speeds up laborious inputting of information, enabling children’s services practitioners to spend more time with their clients, helps commissioners to identify trends so they can prioritise resources, and enable leaders to make informed choices on how services are structured.

Shared Services: Special Report

Fresh evidence suggests collaboration is helping local authorities to find a wider range of care options for vulnerable children and introduce a greater array of good practice approaches to improve outcomes.

How to recruit and retain social workers

Recruitment and retention challenges in children's services mean councils are searching for new ways to attract and retain social workers. Joe Lepper looks at different approaches and investigates what actually works.

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