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Adverse Childhood Experiences: Policy context

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  • Tuesday, September 29, 2020
The basis for much of the work in the UK and internationally on adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) is drawn from a 1997 US study by CDC Kaiser on childhood traumas. This study identified a list of 10 ACEs that then formed the basis for a questionnaire used by researchers as a screening tool to assess the impact of childhood trauma on adults.

Technology in Children's Services: Policy context

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  • Tuesday, March 31, 2020
At its best, technology speeds up laborious inputting of information, enabling children’s services practitioners to spend more time with their clients, helps commissioners to identify trends so they can prioritise resources, and enable leaders to make informed choices on how services are structured.

Special Report: Technology in Social Work

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  • Tuesday, November 8, 2016
Social work leaders, practitioners and teams are increasingly using technology to improve how they engage with children, young people and families, and share vital safeguarding information with partner agencies.

Social work set free to innovate

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  • Tuesday, June 21, 2016
Cambridgeshire and Lincolnshire are among the authorities chosen to take part in the Partners in Practice programme to transform children's social care. Eileen Fursland finds out about their plans.

Adult problems made in childhood

A growing body of research on the impact of adverse childhood experiences is starting to shape the planning and delivery of services for vulnerable families in the UK. Charlotte Goddard investigates.

Research Report: National Survey of Injury Prevention Activities of Children's Centres

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  • Tuesday, April 26, 2016
There is a lot of research into the role children's centres play in improving outcomes for disadvantaged families. However, researchers from the University of Nottingham were keen to investigate centres' role in preventing injuries to under-fives, an area not previously analysed. Previous research has found injuries disproportionately affect children from low-income families.