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The Educational Aspirations and Psychological Wellbeing of Adopted Young People

Local authorities in England and Wales have a legal duty to report annually to central government on looked-after children's psychological wellbeing and academic attainment but this duty ends once children are adopted. Researchers from Cardiff University wanted to fill this gap in understanding of how young people adopted from the care system perform at school, looking at their wellbeing and aspirations around work and education.

Commissioning Care – Research evidence: Sufficiency report

This report provides analysis of all up-to-date local authority sufficiency strategies with a focus on identifying the main perceived challenges for councils to meet their sufficiency duty, what actions are being undertaken or planned to improve commissioning outcomes, and perceived negative consequences associated with using certain commissioning or market shaping approaches.

The Influence of Adoption on Sibling Relationships

Researchers from Cardiff University wanted to explore how sibling relationships are affected by adoption. These can include relationships with brothers and sisters outside the adoptive family, relationships between siblings placed for adoption together, and relationships with children already living in the adoptive family.

Identifying Inequalities in Child Welfare Intervention Rates

Academics from the universities of Coventry, Sheffield, Huddersfield, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Stirling and Queen's University Belfast received Nuffield Foundation funding to study inequalities in the proportions of looked-after children, or those subject to child protection plans, in the four UK nations.

Matching in foster care and how we can improve it

The process of “matching” children and young people in care to their foster carers is a pivotal moment in the care journey; a good “match” decision, process of sharing information, and process of moving into the household can help a child feel safe, loved, and happy. In the UK, the majority of children in care live in fostering households and are affected by matching.