Search Results

Found 184 results for .

New adoption guidance should ease the strain

The decision that a child cannot remain with his or her birth parents is life-changing. And it is always sensitive and difficult, with some sections of the press talking as though social workers are deliberately and callously ripping families apart.

Vulnerable children still need monitoring

How has the world of children's services changed in the past year? By far the biggest change has been the cuts in budgets -- indeed, it can be difficult to focus on anything else.

Harm of drinking during pregnancy lasts a lifetime

On 19 January 1725, The London College of Physicians told the House of Commons: "We do think it our duty humbly to represent that we have concern observed... the frequent use of several sorts of distilled Spirituous Liquors... and too often the cause of weak, feeble, distempered children, who must be instead of advantage and strength, a charge to their country."

Fighting for survival

A manager at one voluntary organisation talks about what the cuts have meant for her project's work, the fight to keep it going and her fears for the future.

Progress in joint working must go on

The decision last week to strip the Children's Workforce Development Council (CWDC) of government funding will inevitably raise concerns that any genuine "development" of the workforce will stall. A plan for how the Department for Education intends to take forward the quango's work is yet to be articulated.

Getting past obstructive parents is essential when children are at risk

Trying to work with families who won't co-operate is one of the hardest parts of being a social worker. But getting past obstructive parents or carers, whether they are openly hostile, or charming but tell a story that doesn't add up, is absolutely vital when children are at risk, as we explore in this month's cover feature.

Sir Philip Green right to propose centralised approach

Sir Philip Green has spotted that the government is inefficient. It buys laptops and paper for wildly different and inflated prices, and manages its property portfolio appallingly. He proposes centralisation, and who could argue against that? A central agency could distribute supplies much more cheaply than every business unit buying their own.

Current filters