Search Results

Found 87 results for .

End service barriers to give families a boost

There have been numerous government-sponsored reviews over the past few months: Graham Allen on early intervention, Frank Field on social mobility, Dame Clare Tickell on the early years and Eileen Munro on child protection.

Early intervention transcends early years

The national focus on early intervention has put a spotlight on the early years. But with many conflating the two ideas, we run the risk of neglecting the need to develop a preventative mindset in our work with school-age children.

Never mind the inspectorate, recruit the right inspectors

On the face of it, the education select committee's call to split Ofsted into two separate inspectorates for education and children's care would represent a further step away from services centred on the needs of the whole child. It is a trend played out in several areas through the disappearance of children's trust arrangements and local authority children's services departments.

Fighting for survival

A manager at one voluntary organisation talks about what the cuts have meant for her project's work, the fight to keep it going and her fears for the future.

We must fight for young people's future

The political debate is dominated by the economy. But while the battle rages in Westminster about whether the financial cuts are necessary or proportionate, there is general agreement that they have had a severe impact on young people, women and children.

Help small charities prove their worth

The Teens and Toddlers programme featured this week has managed to build up a solid evidence base of its effectiveness in helping young people, giving it the opportunity to expand across the UK.

Progress in joint working must go on

The decision last week to strip the Children's Workforce Development Council (CWDC) of government funding will inevitably raise concerns that any genuine "development" of the workforce will stall. A plan for how the Department for Education intends to take forward the quango's work is yet to be articulated.

Sir Philip Green right to propose centralised approach

Sir Philip Green has spotted that the government is inefficient. It buys laptops and paper for wildly different and inflated prices, and manages its property portfolio appallingly. He proposes centralisation, and who could argue against that? A central agency could distribute supplies much more cheaply than every business unit buying their own.

Current filters