The Youth Justice Blog

The Youth Justice Board's (YJB) Young Person Participation Strategy entitled giving young people a voice in youth justice outlines the importance of capturing the views and opinions of young people who offend.

Restorative justice is good value for money and can provide great benefits to those who engage in the process.

Prisons are about discipline and control wherein behaviour is closely regulated and compliance monitored.

Some practitioners have been suspicious of researcher activity. At times they don't see the benefit of supporting research projects with their time and energy or know how to use the findings or outcomes. However, I had the privilege of meeting with Anna-Christina Jones this week. Anna is leading the...

The need to prioritise relationships over the application of "expert fixes" was evident in the findings of the recent HMI Probation report on desistance and young people. Indeed, as Dame Glenys Stacey said recently, a "trusting, open and collaborative relationship with a YOT worker or other professional" is...

Prime Minister David Cameron set out plans back in February for an overhaul of the prison system - promised to be the biggest shake up since the Victorian era, he claimed. Included in the proposals was a commitment to re-introduce problem-solving courts. We waste some £9.5bn a year locking people...

Gareth Jones, chair of The Association of Youth Offending Team Managers Managers recently informed Charlie Taylor (the man leading the youth justice review) that children should have a stronger voice in the youth justice system. This comment has been further strengthened by children and young people...

I had the privilege of meeting with Charlie Taylor last week who visited Cheshire West, Halton and Warrington Youth Offending Service, an organisation described as high performing by HMI Probation recently. This service, like others, has been praised for working efficiently and collaboratively with somewhat...

The United Kingdom (UK) government is due to report to the United Nations (UN) this May on its progress implementing and complying with the children's rights agenda.

The age of criminal responsibility bill (in its second reading) was recently debated in the House of Lords. Lord Dholakia’s private members bill proposes an increase in the age of criminal responsibility from 10 to 12. This is welcoming especially as such a consideration seems to have been excluded from...